Another energy monitoring solution using Zeus

We just completed another installation of Zeus (our IoT monitoring/control system)  in a commercial building to collect and report electrical energy consumption.

Zeus - Wattnode

Wattnode device

In this installation, we connected Zeus to a Wattnode Pulse watt-hour transducer (shown above).  The Wattnode Pulse clamps onto the main power line and reads the killiwatts used, converting this data into a pulse output.  Using custom software on Zeus, we were able to read the output from the Wattnode device, format the data, and send it to the cloud via our builtin WiFi radio.  From there, the data can be analyzed, reported, and/or consolidated with other energy data for this particular building.

For a relatively low cost, the owners of this building are now monitoring their energy usage and can take steps to reduce their overall energy usage.

Navdive for research

I’ve been a volunteer diver for a number of years at Maritime Heritage Minnesota (MHM), a marine archeology firm here in the Twin Cities doing underwater survey work in the state,  Over the past few years, we have been working at Lake Minnetonka to search for sunken wrecks and determine what they are and how they got on the bottom.

We’ve used Navdive (our GPS-based navigation system for divers) on many of our survey dives, including yesterday when we spotted a possible wreck on our surface-based side scan sonar in the dive boat.

NavDive unit

With Navdive, we were able to:

  1. Preprogram GPS coordinates that were obtained using the side scan sonar on the boat, allowing the diver to navigate to each point while remaining underwater.

Sonar image

2.  Capture GPS coordinates of underwater features that are discovered during the dive for cataloging later.

3. During the post dive analysis, we were able to show the path our divers swam during the entire dive.

NavDIve dive trace

The results?  More efficient use of our underwater time, better data for our research, and the ability to integrate all of our data sources (i.e. surface-based side scan sonar, Navdive data, and Google Earth) to produce reports documenting our findings.

For more info on Navdive, see our web site here.

Using Zeus to monitor energy usage

We’ve just recently completed an installation of several of our Zeus Monitor / Control systems in a commercial building setting in which the owners were interested in tracking energy consumption.  Our engineering team created a custom hardware and software interface for our Zeus unit that connects to E-Mon Class 2000 Sub meters, allowing for the real time collection of electrical energy usage within the facility at the panel and transmission of this data to the cloud via WiFi.  Once in the cloud, the data can be used to track real time energy use, to provide alerts of abnormal energy consumption, and to show historical data on demand.

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ScreenHunter_01 May. 13 13.20

“This is a great example that showcases the capability of our Zeus monitor”, commented Kelly Nehowig, President and CTO of Applied Logic Engineering, Inc.  “With this system, we are able to capture energy consumption data in real time and make it available to the client at a very affordable price.”

We’re happy to be partnering with Energy Resource Products and with Grovestreams on this project.

Control multiple Sony DSLR cameras

We are testing a new configuration using our ALE718 Multi Camera LANC Controller with an adapter cable that converts the standard 2.5mm LANC plug into the mini “USB” plug that is compatible with the new Sony MULTI jack connector.

This new configuration allows for the remote control of recording (stop/start) as well as the shutter for photos.  Using this with our multi-camera controller, you can now sync the shutter or video recording of multiple cameras easily.

Almost a record ice out

First dive for 2016 in Lake Minnetonka today.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The ice went out in the middle of last week — almost an all time record for the earliest ice out in this Minnesota lake.  I did have to dive in Wayzata Bay today — St. Louis Bay was still covered in ice.

Water temp was right at 32 degrees, but great visibility.

The season has started!